• The Latest
  • Creative Etiquette Solutions
http://www.newportmanners.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Ashley+Olsen+Dress+Hats+Suede+Dress+Hat+pFTdp6ghddFl1-wpcf_335x335.jpg
Fall Mountain Country Western Wedding

Dear Didi,

We are invited to a very casual western cowboy hat dinner on the groom evening outdoors before the wedding in late October, where it is 50 degrees in the mountains in AZ. What can I wear to be warm enough outside with heaters for cocktails, the ceremony, and reception with dinner and dancing?

-M.Y., AZ

Dear M.Y.,

As you say, it is a casual mountain country dinner the night before the wedding, which makes the dress code about dressing the location and climate in a casual style. It is more about the quality than the dressiness of the outfit. Wear any kind of suede, leather, or animal print article of clothing or boots to the wedding and to the dinner the night before. Make that your statement and add a suede hat.

~Didi

Read More…
http://www.newportmanners.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/Halloween-wedding-wpcf_335x333.png
When the Wedding Welcome Dinner Is on Halloween

Dear Didi,

My son is being married on November 1st. The evening prior to the wedding there is a Welcome Dinner for all guests hosted by me and my husband. Because it is Halloween, my son and future daughter-in-law want it to be a costume party. Is it distasteful for my husband and me to dress as bride and groom? I am wearing my original wedding dress from 1983 and my husband ordered a rental tux from the same era.

-Patti, Santa Clarita, CA

Dear Patti,

Wonderful idea! As you said, it is a costume party. Most of the guests at the Welcome Dinner will know the wedding couple, and that you and your husband are not the ones being married the following day.  Run your idea by your son and his fiancée for their approval. Personally, I think it would be a real hoot. You may want to spook it up a bit and go heavy on the makeup, with big teeth and a wig.

~Didi

Read More…
http://nm.origamihosting.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/images-92.jpeg
Barbados Destination Formal Wedding

Dear Didi,

We are invited to a formal destination wedding in Barbados next month. They told us it will not be on the beach, but we're not really sure if it's outdoors or indoors. Does my husband have to wear a Jacket? And will a short-sleeved dress shirt pass? It's hot and humid there and he is balking at long sleeves and a tie. I thought it was weird that the invitation didn't say if it was outdoors or not.

-A.J.

Dear A.J.,

A "formal destination wedding" means at the very least your husband should wear a summer suit or summer blazer or jacket with trousers, a collared-shirt and handsome tie. Out of respect for the bride on her wedding day, men will be wearing jackets and ties. It sounds as though the ceremony is not taking place on the beach, but in a hotel or a private home, where they have a tent with a wooden dance floor. On tropical islands such as Barbados there is an indoor-outdoor lifestyle where tiled and stone terraces with a wooden dance floor are used for dining and dancing. Look at the invitation, if it specifies 'Black Tie' or 'Formal Attire,' your husband should dress accordingly. However, he can wear a white dinner jacket, because you'll be in a tropical climate. It is not exactly a short-sleeved dress shirt, but cooler than a tuxedo jacket. At some point after the dancing begins the groom will take off his jacket, and that's the cue for your husband to take off his jacket and fold his tie into one of the pockets and escort you onto the dance floor.

~Didi

Read More…
http://nm.origamihosting.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/peanut1_360_360_90.jpg
Children + Peanut Allergy

Dear Didi,

We admit to being helicopter parents of a first grader who is allergic to peanuts. Peanuts are everywhere and this is the first time he's taking his lunch. What can we do to make people, as well as his classmates, aware of the seriousness of his allergy? The school health clinic has his EpiPens and we hope he's prepared for a life threatening emergency, to the best of his seven-year-old ability.

-D.S., Providence, RI

Dear D.S.,

It sounds as though you've prepared the school and your son for an emergency. Hopefully, most schools understand the seriousness of the problem. According to the advocacy group FARE (Food Allergy Research & Education), one out of every thirteen school age child have a food allergy. Lunchrooms should be monitored, cafeteria food nut free, and epinephrine auto-injectors known as EpiPens (containing adrenaline for emergency treatment for anaphylaxis--a traumatic reaction that can cause death within minutes) are on hand. You're right in fearing that your son may be on the school bus, in the playground, at another child's house, or at a birthday party when he's given peanuts in some form. Whether or not you send him with an EpiPen sealed in a ziplock bag tucked into his backpack to school or to play, only you can train him to know what to do. Tell the grownup in charge about the seriousness of the allergy, the symptoms and where to find the EpiPen. Having unexpired EpiPens in school and at home are a must, but I don't need to tell you that. Aside from what you already know, lobby your congressmen to support national legislation in the form of the School Access to Emergency Epinephrine Act, which would require schools to stock prescribed epinephrine and allow authorized staff to administer it. The bill was passed in the House last July and will be voted on in the Senate this fall.

~Didi

Read More…

more_topics